Moved to Greater Love
Moved to Greater Love

Holy Saturday, April 19

Today’s Grace

I pray for the grace to love and follow Christ more closely, which bring me to identify with the Lord in his suffering and death in order to experience new life in his resurrection.

Scripture/Reading

Reading via the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops website:

Lk 23:56
And on the Sabbath day they rested, as the Law required.

Reading via the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops website:

2 Cor 5:14-15
The love of Christ overwhelms us when we reflect that if one man has died for all,
Then all men should be dead;
And the reason he died for all
was so that living men should live no longer for themselves,
but for him who died and was raised to life for them.

Reflection Questions

  1. This day must have been the longest Sabbath ever for the disciples. Imagine what Mary, John, Peter, Mary Magdalene, John Mark, Joseph of Arimathea and all of the disciples did on that first Holy Saturday. Jesus was in the tomb. They were alone. They rested. And they went over and over and over the events of the last two days. Imagine what they might have said to one another. What would you have said to them?
  2. The Lenten journey has led to this liminal moment when I am willing to surrender and faithfully follow the Lord through the mystery of his Passion. I reflect on the past two weeks and how I have experienced the grace of vision: the vision to see, the vision to hear, the vision to read the signs of the times — in order to discern more deeply how we are called, as companions in the Lord, to follow Christ and to serve him in our work, our ministries and our lives.

Reflection

“Folly for Christ and the Glory of God” from “The Road from La Storta” by Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, SJ (p. 91):

Thus Ignatius does not oppose the folly of the cross to the glory of God in the sense that one would truly wish to be a fool for Christ, but then his glory would be at variance with it. There does not exist one Gospel of the glory of God and another of the cross. One and one alone is the triumphant Easter proclamation: “By his death he has conquered death.” In the exercise of the Kingdom [95], Ignatius considers the continuing work and mission of Christ as the entering of all humanity into the glory of the Father by its first following Christ on his way of the cross: “in bearing all wrongs and all abuse and all poverty, both actual and spiritual” [98]. To carry out the mission of Christ, which consists in proclaiming the Gospel of the glory of the Father to humankind which understands glory in a totally different way, is to make one’s own the Gospel of the cross. This latter does not consist first of all in suffering and death, but primarily in vibrant life that comes through losing one’s own self in self-gift and self-surrender so that the glory of the Father may shine forth in the lives of our brothers and sisters. It is the glory of the Father that will give a concrete form and expression to our mission of “carrying his cross.”

Selections from the conclusion of “The First Jesuits” by John O’Malley, SJ:

Leadership is a gift difficult to analyze, but it consists to a large extent in vision, in the ability to see how at a given juncture change is most consistent with one’s scope than staying the course. It consists as well in the courage and self-possession required to make the actual decision to change to convince others of the validity and viability of the new direction. Such was Ignatius’ vision and courage about the schools. He had another ability that is equally important for a leader. He could recognize and utilize talents that complimented his own.

According to Polanco, Ignatius possessed “in an uncommon degree certain natural gifts from God: great energy in undertaking extraordinary difficult tasks, great constancy in pursing them, and great prudence in seeing them to completion.”

Other Resources

View the daily readings at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops website.

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